Argonne National Laboratory
Nuclear Energy Student & Postdoctoral Opportunities
You can be part of it
 
Argonne National Laboratory Nuclear Energy Students Programs at Argonne National Lab
Argonne is 5th Best Place to work for postdocs

Argonne a top place to work for postdocs in 2013
For the third year in a row, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory is one of the 10 best places to work as a postdoctoral researcher, according to The Scientist magazine's annual survey. Argonne ranked fifth, moving up from sixth place last year, earning specific praise for its benefits and attention to personal and family life. More...

Resources

Downloadable docs

Practical

Downloadable docs

Chicago Resources

NE Postdoctoral Projects

Category: Materials Testing

Follow us: follow us on Twitter  | NE on Facebook  
Follow Argonne Students & Young Professionals: Argonne Students and Young Professionals on Facebook  | Argonne Students and Young Professionals on LinkedIn  

Contacting a Project lead

  • Take special note of always adding Lee Ann Ciarlette in cc () to your email when contacting one of the project leads listed in this page.
INSTRUMENTATION AND NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION
The Instrumentation and Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Section conducts research and development in a broad range of energy-related technologies. Major areas of responsibilities are the development of instruments or NDE techniques for fossil energy, conservation, automobile, textile, waste management, and nuclear technologies, as well as for arms control and verification treaties and homeland security.

The current instrumentation efforts of the Section focus on the development of advanced sensors and control systems. This work encompasses (a) multiphase flow measurement techniques, including in situ measurement of temperature, fluid level, pressure, density, and viscosity; (b) development of leak detection and location systems for power plants; and (c) a number of projects for arms control to develop sensor/instruments for treaty verification and homeland security. Sensors used in the treaty verification project and homeland security projects are based on acoustic microwave/millimeter wave, submillimeter terahertz, and mass spectrometer techniques. The instruments/sensors are used to detect chemical, biological or nuclear agents as well as explosives. In addition, work has started in developing sensors for biomedical applications.

Our NDE efforts focus on development of techniques and systems for materials characterization and evaluation of component reliability. This work includes (a) characterizing materials, especially ceramics composites, as well as metal, during various stages of fabrication; (b) evaluating the structural integrity of components of a wide variety of energy systems; and (c) pinpointing causes and remedies for improper component behavior through failure analysis. The techniques used to perform this work are based on acoustic, X-ray diffraction and X-ray tomography, NMR spectroscopy and imaging, microwave, neutron diffraction, optical methods, and eddy current.
Contact: D. Chamberlain | | Related Information
STEAM GENERATOR TUBE INTEGRITY PROGRAM
The structural integrity of pressurized water reactor steam generator tubes containing stress corrosion cracks and similar defects is being experimentally and analytically investigated. Tubes with prototypic stress corrosion cracks are being produced in the laboratory, and these tubes are being tested under simulated operating conditions to determine their failure pressures and leak rates. The structural response of these tubes is also being evaluated using fracture mechanics calculations and finite-element modeling. In addition, existing and advanced eddy current and other NDE techniques for the detection and characterization of flaws in tubes are being evaluated.
Contact: Ken Natesan | | Related Information
CORROSION OF MATERIALS IN THE PRESENCE OF DEPOSITS
The program involves experimental studies to establish the mechanisms of corrosion of heat-exchanger and gas-turbine materials in the presence of deposits that are generated during the combustion of coal and coal-derived fuels. The research will require background in the areas of thermodynamics and kinetics of gas-solid reactions and fluid-flow characteristics that influence the type and rate of deposit(s). A background in X-ray diffraction is desirable.
Contact: Ken Natesan | | Related Information
STRESS-CORROSION CRACKING OF LIGHT-WATER REACTOR MATERIALS IN SIMULATED COOLANT ENVIRONMENTS
The program involves an experimental investigation of the influence of simulated reactor-coolant environments, under normal and off-normal water chemistry conditions, on the susceptibility of piping and structural materials to stress-corrosion cracking. The effect of microstructure of the materials, water chemistry (viz. oxygen, hydrogen and impurity concentrations, pH), and temperature on the rate and mode of crack growth is being determined for a range of loading conditions. Background in the areas of electrochemistry, electron microscopy, aqueous corrosion, and physical metallurgy are applicable.
Contact: Ken Natesan | | Related Information
ALLOY MODIFICATION FOR IMPROVED CORROSION RESISTANCE
The program involves experimental studies to establish the composition and microstructure of surface layers (created by ion implantation, surface coating, laser annealing, etc.) that impart improved corrosion resistance in oxygen and oxygen-sulfur-chloride environments. A background in transmission electron microscopy and Auger Electron Spectroscopy is desirable.
Contact: Ken Natesan | | Related Information
IRRADIATION PERFORMANCE OF REACTOR MATERIALS
The principal objective of the programs in the Irradiation Performance Section is to assess the behavior of nuclear materials, including cladding and structural components, in the environment of nuclear fission and fusion reactors. These environments result in neutron damage and chemical, metallurgical, and mechanical processes that occur over a wide range of elevated temperatures. The programs fall into the following categories: (1) postirradiation characterization of materials, and (2) postirradiation thermal/mechanical testing of materials. A significant fraction of the Section’s activity is devoted to the performance characterization of light-water reactor fuel systems during loss of coolant accidents and spent-nuclear-fuel cask transport accidents. The postirradiation characterization and testing activities utilize the Irradiated Materials Laboratory and other radiological-controlled laboratories to perform examination, testing and analyses. Available research tools include optical microscopes, transmission electron microscope, hydrogen and oxygen determinators, and numerous thermal and mechanical testing instruments. Cooperative research programs are welcome.
Contact: Mike Billone | | Related Information

Announcements

Argonne a top place to work for postdocs in 2013
For the third year in a row, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory is one of the 10 best places to work as a postdoctoral researcher, according to The Scientist magazine's annual survey. Argonne ranked fifth, moving up from sixth place last year, earning specific praise for its benefits and attention to personal and family life. More...