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Activities in 2014

2014 NE Summer Intern Seminar Series

These seminars provide a taste of some of the Division's important work to address global problems such as proliferation of nuclear materials, spent fuel disposition (called "waste" in current public discourse) and developing a sustainable energy system. Students from other divisions are invited to attend.
Target Audience: Summer Students in NE or other Argonne Divisions.

DOWNLOAD: 2014 NE Summer Intern Seminar Series [1031.04 KB, last mod.: August 12 2016, 14:38]

  • Thomas F. EwingWelcome to NE and Intern Orientation
    Tom Ewing, Associate Director, Nuclear Engineering Division
    May 29, 2014, 02:00pm, location: Bldg. 203 Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    Thomas F. Ewing, Associate Director of the NE Division, will welcome NE summer interns and provide a short overview of activities in the NE Division. Afterwards, the Student Outreach Committee will discuss planned intern activities and introduce pertinent Division employees.

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  • T.K. Kim

    Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor – Past and Future
    Taek K. Kim, Principal Nuclear Engineer and Section Manager, Reactor & Fuel Cycle Analysis Section
    June 4, 2014, 10:30am, location: Guest House Restaurant
    Warning SOCIALIZE: This seminar will be immediately followed by lunch for NE students, postdocs and supervisors/managers!

    Seminar Abstract:

    Since the first electricity from nuclear energy was obtained at Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR-I) on December 20, 1951, we have dreamed of a sustainable nuclear fuel cycle for the ideal use of nuclear energy resources and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) technology has been at the center of that dream. The United States has designed, built, and operated fast reactors (mostly SFRs) from EBR-I up until the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Experimental  Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) were permanently shut down and the IFR program was canceled in 1994. Worldwide, SFR technologies have logged more than 400 operating-years, and many countries (China, India, Russia, Japan, France, Korea, and even the U.S.) have very active plans for SFR deployment in the near future. In this seminar, the history of SFR development will be discussed, including the critical turning points of nuclear system development in the United States and the reasoning behind the recent refocus on SFR technology.

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  • Florent Heidet

    Fast Reactor Physics
    Florent Heidet, Nuclear Engineer,Nuclear Systems Analysis Department
    June 10, 2014, 2:00pm, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    How fast reactor physics differs from thermal reactor physics, and how the fast spectrum allows pursuit of various strategic objectives, e.g., resource extension, actinide burnup in lieu of disposal, weapons material disposition.

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  • Natalia Saraeva

    Early Career Seminar: Project Management, Risk Management and Policy in the R&D World: Example of the GTRI-Convert Program
    Natalia Saraeva, Nuclear Engineer, Technical Integration Section
    June 17, 2014, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203 Auditorium

    Seminar Abstract:

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)’s Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reactor Conversion Program (GTRI-Convert) supports minimization of highly enriched uranium (HEU) use in the world by converting research and test reactors as well as isotope production facilities from HEU to low enriched uranium (LEU). The program is a continuation and expansion of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program that was established by DOE in 1978. Argonne has successfully led the technology development for conversion of these reactors since the very beginning of the program - 1978. On behalf of DOE’s NNSA, Argonne is responsible for both technical details and project support of GTRI-Convert.  In those roles, Argonne is required to conduct formal project management and risk management activities and to report to NNSA on conversion progress.

    Why are project management and risk management required and what do they entail? This presentation will answer these questions using the example of GRTI-Convert – a complex, multinational and multi-institutional program. The presentation will also demonstrate how R&D, project management and policies are interconnected and interdependent. The increasing importance of this interdependency in today’s world will be highlighted.

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  • Kirsten Laurin-Kovitz

    Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: How It Happened
    Kirsten Laurin-Kovitz, Manager, Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Section
    June 24, 2014, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203 Auditorium

    Seminar Abstract:

    Proliferation threat and response: Coevolution of proliferation and nonproliferation.

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    News piece on how proliferators want indigenous capabilities to create WMD: “Made in the USA” in Iran from CBS

  • Mark Nutt

    Used Nuclear Fuel Management in the U.S.
    Mark Nutt, Principal Nuclear Engineer, Innovative Systems & Engineering Assessments Section
    July 1, 2014, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    The seminar will provide a brief history of nuclear waste management in the U.S. since the inception of nuclear power through the present.  The impacts of the decision to no longer pursue development of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository will be discussed.  The recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Commission for Americas Nuclear Future will be summarized and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) strategy for managing used nuclear fuel going forward will be presented.  On-going activities in the DOE's Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign and Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project will be described.

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    See also: Waste Management Systems Analysis - NE website

  • F. Moore

    RAP’ping at Fukushima: Argonne’s Role in Radiation Monitoring
    Frank Moore, RAP Scientist/ Equipment Coordinator
    July 8, 2014, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203 Auditorium

    Seminar Abstract:

    Following a magnitude 9 earthquake and 14-meter tsunami on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan suffered a major loss-of-coolant accident and large quantities of radioactive materials were released to the environment. Within 3 days of the earthquake, the White House directed the Department of Energy to deploy a team to Japan to provide radiological monitoring support to the Department of Defense, Department of State, and the Government of Japan. This team consisted of personnel and equipment from DOE-NNSA, the Remote Sensing Laboratories in Las Vegas and Washington DC, and several RAP Regions, including four team members from Argonne. This talk will give an overview of the accident and description of the DOE assets and capabilities called upon to respond. Some first-hand experiences of radiological monitoring in Japan will be discussed and some monitoring results will be presented.

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  • S. Lomperski

    CFD code validation: should you believe those experimentalists?
    Steve Lomperski, Principal Nuclear Engineer
    July 15, 2014, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    Our research group builds and operates fluid mechanics experiments that generate data to validate computation fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. Analysts use the data to check their modelling and simulations against the real world, i.e., nature. Such studies require high bandwidth "whole field" measurements, which are obtained with specialized instruments that produce images nearly as beguiling as CFD graphics. But are they reliable? Unlike conventional point sensors such as thermocouples, exotic instruments are not delivered with NIST-traceable calibration certificates. How does the experimentalist establish the accuracy of data that might consist of tens of thousands of points across a flow field? Can you analysts (and you're nearly all analysts) trust such data to validate your simulations?

    This talk will present the basic physics behind two fascinating optical instruments used for fluid dynamics experiments: particle image velocimeters and fiber optic distributed temperature sensors. We'll show that establishing accuracy of these advanced techniques is a work in progress. Analysts should trust, but verify.

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  • Emily Shemon

    Early Career Seminar: High Performance Neutronics Simulations at Argonne National Laboratory
    Emily Shemon, Nuclear Engineer, Neutronics Methods & Codes Section
    July 22, 2014, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203 Auditorium

    Seminar Abstract:

    During the past few years, the Neutronics Methods and Codes group in the Nuclear Engineering Division has researched and developed high performance neutronics tools that take advantage of massively parallel systems such as Argonne’s Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF). The resulting toolset includes the second order discrete ordinates code, PROTEUS-SN, which has been used to analyze several problems. In this talk, Emily will introduce the supercomputing resources for which the high performance neutronics codes were tailored, introduce the PROTEUS-SN code, and show an analysis example performed with PROTEUS-SN on the ALCF supercomputer.

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  • Craig Gerardi

    Mindboggling Science: The Leidenfrost Edition
    Craig Gerardi, Nuclear Engineer,
    Engineering Development & Applications Department
    July 29, 2014, 10:30am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120
    Warning Lunch provided immediately following seminar.

    Seminar Abstract:

    Water flows uphill? Liquid nitrogen skitters across a table? A hand immersed in hot molten lead emerges unscathed? Are these cinematic tricks? Are the laws of physics being broken?  Alas, science saves the day with a very simple explanation of these phenomena: the Leidenfrost effect.

    One of the most common examples of the Leidenfrost effect in action involves a pancake griddle.  Water droplets will hover over a very hot pancake griddle and take a long time to evaporate.  The griddle is much hotter than the boiling point which causes the water near the griddle surface to rapidly turn to steam so that the drop hovers on its own vapor cushion.  This vapor cushion insulates the water droplet from the hot griddle which slows overall droplet evaporation.  Oddly, if the temperature were reduced below the Leidenfrost point, the droplet could touch the surface directly and rapidly boil away.  This phenomenon is counterintuitive of course: total evaporation is slower on the hotter surface.  It also causes difficulties as engineered cooling systems are expected to transfer more heat, rather than less, as surface temperatures rise. 

    Various aspects of the Leidenfrost effect have been studied since it was first reported by Johann Leidenfrost in 1756.  Measurements typically have been performed with zero or small incident velocity.  However, in many real-world situations droplets crash into heated surfaces which influences the Leidenfrost temperature and local heat transfer.  Models need to be developed to help us understand and control processes such as rewetting of fuel rods in a nuclear power plant during reflooding after the postulated loss-of-coolant-accident where droplets in the dispersed flow regime impact hot cladding.

    High-speed x-ray full field phase-contrast imaging, a relatively new technique, makes it possible to track dynamic changes in gas-liquid interfaces in real time.  The partially coherent x-rays produced by a synchrotron such as the APS can reveal the interface between phases even when the interface is inside a thick liquid medium.  This makes it possible to clearly visualize internal vapor generation within a falling droplet at unprecedented speeds and spatial resolutions.  These visualizations will be presented and scrutinized during this talk.

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DOWNLOAD: 2014 NE Summer Intern Seminar Series [1031.04 KB, last mod.: August 12 2016, 14:38]

Other Activities

Information about current and or upcoming activities can be found in the NE Student Outreach home page.

Contact the Student Outreach Committee

If you would like to contact the NE Student Outreach Committee for further information or to request a student activity, please email .