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Activities in 2013

2013 NE Summer Intern Seminar Series

These seminars provide a taste of some of the Division's important work to address global problems such as proliferation of nuclear materials, spent fuel disposition (called "waste" in current public discourse) and developing a sustainable energy system. Students from other divisions are invited to attend.
Target Audience: Summer Students in NE or other Argonne Divisions.

DOWNLOAD: 2013 NE Summer Intern Seminar Series [332.79 KB, last mod.: August 12 2016, 14:38]

  • Jord Roglans-RibasWelcome to NE and Intern Orientation
    Jordi Roglans-Ribas, Deputy Director, Nuclear Engineering Division
    May 29, 2013, 02:00pm, in Bldg. 203 Auditorium

    Seminar Abstract:

    Jordi Roglans-Ribas, Deputy Director of the NE Division, will welcome NE summer interns and provide a short overview of activities in the NE Division. Afterwards, the Student Outreach Committee will discuss planned intern activities and introduce pertinent Division employees.

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  • A. Bergeron

    Early Career Seminar: Challenges to Overcome towards the HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion of Research & Test Reactors
    Aurelien Bergeron, Nuclear Engineer, Core Design & Safety Analysis Section
    May 30, 2013, 10:30am, in Bldg. 402 Gallery
    Warning SOCIALIZE: This seminar will be immediately followed by lunch for NE students, postdocs and supervisors/managers!

    Seminar Abstract:

    The conversion of research and test reactors from the use of Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel (235U/U < 20wt%) is a Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program that is a continuation of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program begun in 1978 under the technical leadership of ANL. Argonne remains a leader of the global effort. As of today, more than 85 reactors have been converted or shutdown prior to conversion but the most challenging reactors remain to be converted.

    Conversion analyses begin by intensive benchmarking of models by comparison to measurements of the existing HEU cores and against other codes. After satisfactory benchmarking, feasibility analyses to design a new LEU fuel element are performed. In order to succeed, the core performance and safety margins must be preserved despite the greatly increased uranium loading.  Designing an LEU reactor for manufacturing and utilization costs, while at the same time requiring minimum modifications of the facilities are also core principles of conversions.

    While these “conversion principles” are common among conversions in the program, the fact that the remaining reactors to be converted have unique and exotic designs makes each conversion distinctly complex. The seminar will present some examples of technical challenges and proposed solutions to overcome them:

    • > Monte-Carlo analyses for detailed benchmarking, depletion, and performance calculations applied to compact, exotic geometries.
    • > Integrated modeling of neutronic and thermal-hydraulics to prepare sound safety bases.
    • > Fuel performance modeling during irradiation by coupling CFD calculations and fuel behavior model.

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  • F. Moore

    RAP’ping at Fukushima: Argonne’s Role in Radiation Monitoring
    Frank Moore, RAP Scientist/ Equipment Coordinator
    June 4, 2013, 10:00am, Warning NOTE LOCATION CHANGE: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    Following a magnitude 9 earthquake and 14-meter tsunami on March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan suffered a major loss-of-coolant accident and large quantities of radioactive materials were released to the environment. Within 3 days of the earthquake, the White House directed the Department of Energy to deploy a team to Japan to provide radiological monitoring support to the Department of Defense, Department of State, and the Government of Japan. This team consisted of personnel and equipment from DOE-NNSA, the Remote Sensing Laboratories in Las Vegas and Washington DC, and several RAP Regions, including four team members from Argonne. This talk will give an overview of the accident and description of the DOE assets and capabilities called upon to respond. Some first-hand experiences of radiological monitoring in Japan will be discussed and some monitoring results will be presented.

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  • Chi Bum Bahn

    Early Career Seminar: Materials Degradation in Nuclear Power Systems: Steam Generator Tube Integrity Research
    Chi Bum Bahn, Nuclear Engineer, Corrosion & Mechanics of Materials Section
    June 11, 2013, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    Materials degradation (especially corrosion and cracking) of structural materials in nuclear power plants is one of major issues for plant safety and long-term operation. In pressurized water reactors, a steam generator (SG) consisting of thousands of metal alloy tubing is a major structural component. SG tubes in nuclear power plants have a long history of materials degradation due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC). To detect various forms of tube degradation including SCC, periodic inspections using non-destructive examination techniques, such as eddy current (EC) testing, are commonly employed. Therefore, it is critical to evaluate and validate the reliability of the EC testing methods used for assessing the structural integrity of the SG. Once inspection identifies any cracks, it is necessary to decide whether the crack is small enough to leave and continue operation. Analytical or numerical modeling efforts have been conducted to determine the crack size limits from the structural integrity point of view. In this talk, steam generator tube corrosion and cracking research related to the in-service inspection is discussed. Specifically, an experimental method to produce SCC tube samples representative of the field ones is introduced. Modeling and experimental activities related to the SG tube structural integrity are also reviewed.

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  • Kirsten Laurin-Kovitz

    Nuclear Weapons Proliferation: How It Happened
    Kirsten Laurin-Kovitz, Manager, Technical Nonproliferation Policy Support Section
    June 18, 2013, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    Proliferation threat and response: Coevolution of proliferation and nonproliferation.

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    News piece on how proliferators want indigenous capabilities to create WMD: “Made in the USA” in Iran from CBS

  • Emily Wolters

    Early Career Seminar: High Performance Neutronics Simulations at Argonne National Laboratory
    Emily Wolters, Nuclear Engineer, Neutronics Methods & Codes Section
    June 25, 2013, 10:00am, NOTE LOCATION CHANGE: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    During the past few years, the Neutronics Methods and Codes group in the Nuclear Engineering Division has researched and developed high performance neutronics tools that take advantage of massively parallel systems such as Argonne’s Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF). The resulting toolset includes the second order discrete ordinates code, PROTEUS-SN, which has been used to analyze several problems. In this talk, Emily will introduce the supercomputing resources for which the high performance neutronics codes were tailored, introduce the PROTEUS-SN code, and show an analysis example performed with PROTEUS-SN on the ALCF supercomputer.

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  • Mark Nutt

    Used Nuclear Fuel Management in the U.S.
    Mark Nutt, Manager, Engineering Assessments Section
    July 2, 2013, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    The seminar will provide a brief history of nuclear waste management in the U.S. since the inception of nuclear power through the present.  The impacts of the decision to no longer pursue development of the Yucca Mountain geologic repository will be discussed.  The recommendations made by the Blue Ribbon Commission for Americas Nuclear Future will be summarized and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) strategy for managing used nuclear fuel going forward will be presented.  On-going activities in the DOE's Used Fuel Disposition Research and Development Campaign and Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project will be described.

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  • Di Yun

    Early Career Seminar: Nuclear Fuel Materials Investigation Through Combined Experimental and Simulation Methods
    Di Yun, Nuclear Engineer, Fuels & Materials Modeling Section
    July 9, 2013, 9:30am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    Nuclear materials research has always been a key ingredient in nuclear engineering and technology development, traditionally emphasizing more on the engineering aspects. With advancements in experimental techniques and instrumentation, together with computational power and simulation methods, more science oriented research has been brought to the focus of today’s nuclear materials investigations.

    Nuclear fuel materials research is very challenging in the sense that many different processes co-exist leading to degradation of fuel (both Uranium based fuel and cladding materials) properties during reactor operation. These processes include radiation damage, fission gas accumulation, chemical transport, chemical corrosions, etc. In this seminar, both experimental investigations and simulation work centered around metallic nuclear fuels will be discussed. The simulation work utilized a commercial finite-element package, COMSOL, to probe fuel performance characteristics of metallic fuels as well as a rate theory based framework to connect meso-scale phenomena to the continuum scale. The experimental work utilized some of Argonne’s most established experimental facilities, the Advanced Photon Source (APS), the Argonne Tandem Linac Accelerator System (ATLAS) and the Intermediate Voltage Electron Microscope (IVEM), to support the modeling efforts.

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  • M. Farmer

    Light Water Reactor Severe Accident Analysis and Experimentation at Argonne Related to the Nuclear Incident in Japan
    Mitch Farmer, Manager, Engineering Development Labs
    July 16, 2013, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203, Room D120

    Seminar Abstract:

    The 2011 earthquake and Tsunami in Japan initiated severe accidents at several of the reactors at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex. These accidents have led to a resurgence of interest in Light Water Reactor (LWR) severe accident phenomenology. This presentation will provide an historical overview of this research and discuss some of the basic physics involved with severe accidents, as well as phenomenological models that have been developed to describe the progression. The presentation will also include a general discussion about the application of the LWR severe accident knowledge base to events at Fukushima.

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  • S. Mohanty

    Early Career Seminar: Finite Element Modeling: With Applications to HTGR Graphite Core Structural Integrity Analysis & Environmental Fatigue Modeling in LWR Piping
    S. Mohanty, Mechanical Engineer, Corrosion & Mechanics of Materials Section
    July 23, 2013, 10:00am, location: Bldg. 203 Auditorium

    Seminar Abstract:

    Finite element analysis (FEA) techniques are increasingly becoming sophisticated and can be used for structural integrity prediction of reactor components subjected to complex multi-physics environment, and under material and geometrical nonlinearity. In this seminar the use of commercially available ABAQUS finite element code for reactor structural integrity analysis will be discussed. The first part of the talk will cover the multi-physics stress analysis of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) reflector and fuel bricks. The second part of the talk will give an overview of the ongoing experimental and modeling activities in the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRs) program. Representative results from the Extended Finite Element Method (XFEM) based dynamic crack propagation modeling of steam generator tubes will be presented. Also, the use of FEA for estimating residual stresses in manufacturing processes will be discussed. The third part of the talk will briefly discuss the development of a new facility for monitoring and predicting structural integrity of components based on embedded sensing technology.

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  • Florent Heidet

    Fast Reactor Physics
    Florent Heidet, Nuclear Engineer,
    Nuclear Systems Analysis Department
    July 30, 2013, NOTE TIME AND LOCATION CHANGE: 10:30am, location: Bldg. 362 Auditorium.
    WarningLunch immediately following, served in Room F108.

    Seminar Abstract:

    How fast reactor physics differs from thermal reactor physics, and how the fast spectrum allows pursuit of various strategic objectives, e.g., resource extension, actinide burnup in lieu of disposal, weapons material disposition.

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DOWNLOAD: 2013 NE Summer Intern Seminar Series [332.79 KB, last mod.: August 12 2016, 14:38]

Other Activities

Information about current and or upcoming activities can be found in the NE Student Outreach home page.

Contact the Student Outreach Committee

If you would like to contact the NE Student Outreach Committee for further information or to request a student activity, please email .